Tag Archives: Library staff

Library staff talk about art: a library welcome to new Art & Design students

Art & Design library staff at Llandaff each chose an artwork, work of design or other image and wrote a sentence or two to explain why we had chosen that particular one.

We did this to introduce ourselves to new students not with boring images of our faces but as people fascinated by art and design and the world just like our library users…..

These images were chosen for a variety of different reasons ranging from their political message, the appreciation of beauty, reminiscence and the pondering of big themes. Art is a powerful language!!

We will be wearing our chosen image on our staff ID card for the first few weeks of this term so that you can match the image to the person!

To get a glimpse of the art work we’ll be wearing, click on “Library staff” tag in this blog.

By Jenny Godfrey, Art & Design and Visual Resources Librarian

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Jenny’s Art, Design and Architecture Blog

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Llandaff Library staff talk about art: Alex Hughes

Tom Gauld: click on image to find out more about artist

Tom Gauld: click on image to find out more about artist

This is an illustration by Tom Gauld whose work I love. I don’t really have any deeply personal reasons why, I think I just really like his odd sense of humour, his work always makes me laugh but I can’t explain why!

I also love the originality of his style, it’s so easy to recognise his illustrations, which is something I really admire.

Alex Hughes works part time in the library.

 

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Llandaff Library staff talk about art: Gina Reese

Cornelia Parker ‘Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View ’, 1991, Tate Gallery

Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View  1991

Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View 1991

Cold Dark Matter began life as a garden shed filled with objects from her own and friends’ sheds and things bought at a car boot sale. She then asked the army to blow up the shed under very controlled conditions. The objects, along with the fragments of the shed, were collected and suspended in a closed room in an attempt to recreate the moment just after the explosion.

Walking around this installation in Tate Modern made me feel guilty – to find beauty in destruction seemed morally wrong.  In nature the beauty of destruction and decay can often serve to emphasise both regeneration and the circle of life, so all these years later I choose to absorb and appreciate “beauty” in whatever guise I find it.

Gina Reese works full time at Llandaff Library.

 

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Llandaff Library staff talk about art: Helen Clifford

Gordon Matta-Clarke Splitting  (1974)

Gordon Matta-Clarke Splitting  (1974)

Gordon Matta-Clarke Splitting (1974)

 ‘This image has sat in my head and informed my practice for the past 20 years.

Gordon Matta-Clarke is best known for works in which he dissected existing buildings, slicing into and opening them up, using the simplest of means and changing them into gravity-defying, profoundly disorientating walk-through sculptures.

The work thrills me with its anarchy and poignancy,  and the cross referencing of architecture, art and politics are a long term interest of mine.’

During the 1970s, Matta-Clark made the works for which he is best known: his “anarchitecture.” These were temporary works created by sawing and carving sections out of buildings, most of which were scheduled to be destroyed.

Helen is a practising artist and works in the library part-time.

 

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Llandaff Library staff talk about art: Doreen Barnaville

 

art by Doreen Barnaville

art by Doreen Barnaville

 

How do I describe my work? Maybe with these words . . . .

dye, fold, twist, clamp, stitch, indigo, textiles, cyanotype, research, photograph, expose, develop, print . . .    

They are the elements I use individually or in combination to piece together and capture memories on cloth. I also make artist’s books using the same mixture of materials techniques and processes.

The library has special collections which include a collection of over 200 artists’ books.

Doreen works in partnership with tutors and runs sessions where the artists’ books collection can be handled and explored. These sessions are part of Library Matters which are events and exhibitions that the Library holds throughout the year to tie in with students’ studies.

 

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Llandaff Library staff talk about art: Rebecca Evans and Wendy Smith

Don’t limit your ideas or your research

A mixed culture of neurons (green) and astrocytes (red) derived from human neural stem cells.  Both these cell types are essential for correct brain function

A mixed culture of neurons (green) and astrocytes (red) derived from human neural stem cells.
Both these cell types are essential for correct brain function

 

Our picture is stem cells, important for brain function, they are alive.

We like science, how cells create and that they are part of something much wider.

Health Sciences cover an incredible spectrum of living sciences, continuing to develop, challenge and amaze.

Just as art is more that pictures; don’t limit yourself to thinking science is only statistics. There are many occasions where art and science meet, be it psychology or physiology, so if you need advice for health sciences talk with us

The library contains books on many interesting subjects including anthropology, botany, geography and social history to mention just a few.

Rebecca Evans and Wendy Smith are Health Sciences librarians at Llandaff.

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Llandaff Library staff talk about art: Jenny Godfrey

Agnes Denes  Wheatfield – A Confrontation, Battery Park Landfill, downtown Manhattan, 2 acres of wheat planted & harvested, summer 1982 with artist standing in the field 1982 

Click on photo to find more on Agnes Denes

Click on photo to find more on Agnes Denes

I love this image of Agnes Denes in her wheatfield under the twin towers in NY before they were destroyed. I love the work because therein lies a long story about food  and money and Western greed and the inequalities of the world recounted in beauty and every time I tell students how the money merchants in the twin towers wept to see the wheat gathered in (they spent their days looking a computer screen moving money (and therefore food…) around the world) I get  choked up too.

Jenny Godfrey is visual resources librarian at Llandaff Library

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Jenny’s Art, Design and Architecture blog 

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